Different Oils Used on Bowling Lanes

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Bowling coach Rod Ross and professional bowler Chris Barnes compare the features of different oils. For instance, hooking oils were designed to pick up a roll sooner vs. skid oils which are meant to make a ball delay longer. Learn about the different types of oils used in the game today.

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2 Responses to “Different Oils Used on Bowling Lanes”
  1. daniel

    need tips for bowling on fire.not matching up and no carry.try different balls,pearls and different hand positions,loft.stuck average dropped over ten pins.my style is up the back.got no miss room.hit pocket all night clean 30 mean while high rev shoots 7 and opens and mad when he don’t strike.sometimes kill hand position and hard up outside.but very difficult.move in but miss out a little ball don’t get back to pocket. hit pocket and leave what looks like weak ten.just need more pin action in back to get carry. think i need weaker ball.but guy hiting good went to new strong hooking ball and works for him.so confused.stronger ball don’t cover more board on back end.rolls earlier.

    Reply
    • Customer Service Techs

      Biggest red flag regarding this scenario is hand position. With your hand “up the back” the ball motion will read early and bowling on “fire” just means that it’s going to read even earlier causing flat pocket hits and lower carry percentage. Here are the characteristics to adjust when bowling on an extremely dry lane condition.
      High friction lane surfaces need:
      · Weaker equipment, (polished/pearl coverstocks, high RG cores, less aggressive layouts)
      · Decreased rev rate (relaxing wrist position will help)
      · Increased axis rotation (rotate your hand to the side of the ball during release)
      · Increased ball speed (lower the ball in the stance and use faster footwork to increase speed)
      · Increased loft (target further on the lane and stand taller in the initial stance and at release, loft should not be using more muscle to throw further)
      You have the correct ideas but perhaps you need a coach to help measure your abilities and assist with making adjustments. Look for a USBC certified coach in your area. Here’s a link to the “Find a Coach (http://www.bowl.com/findacoach/) ” feature on Bowl.com.
      Thanks for continuing with the USBC Bowling Academy.

      Reply

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