Understanding Bowling Ball Motion

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Bowling coaches Lou Marquez and Stephen Padilla increase our understanding of bowling ball motion and provide pointers on how to make your game stronger. Observation of your ball as it reacts to the different phases of the lane will allow you to make adjustments to your game.

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4 Responses to “Understanding Bowling Ball Motion”
  1. LETTREE Gérard

    how long could be the roll phase to have goog carry? I am french excuse my poor english.

    Reply
    • Customer Service Techs

      “Good carry” comes from ball speed, entry angle, ball position and the ball being in the roll phase as it enters the pins. It can also be said that good carry comes from the pin spots, the pin deck, flat gutters, and side walls, which all play a factor.

      Once the ball gets to the roll phase it begins to lose speed so this phase would have the greatest force on the pins if it were as close to the pocket as possible. For good pin carry the roll phase should be close to the pocket, perhaps within a few feet or approximately one meter.

      On shorter distance oil patterns 36’ (feet) or less, the roll phase will typically be longer and on long patterns 42’ (feet) or more it will typically be shorter.

      Remember to take into consideration the other factors of pin carry and let your ball guide your decisions to produce higher scores.

      Stephen Padilla

      Reply
  2. Josh

    So side roll creates a length, where forward roll creates shorter length and is quicker to respond?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Josh. Correct. Side roll lengthens the skid phase and delays the hook phase of ball motion while forward roll shortens the skid phase and the hook phase and lengthens the roll phase. Another way to think about it would be to consider that the ball is traveling one direction (toward the pins) and spinning a different direction (counter clockwise – for a right handed traditional hook player). Forward roll reaches the roll phase sooner because the travel direction and spin direction are closer to being the same. Side roll reaches the roll phase later because the travel direction and spin direction are further away from being the same. You got this. Thanks for continuing with the Bowling Academy.

      Reply

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